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Elawadly given 10 years to life

May 18, 2012

The Morning News — Leslie Mielke Geoffrey Salem Elawadly killed Anthony J. (A.J.) Camp in 2011. Thursday Elawadly was sentenced. Camp's family expressed relief about this sentencing. From the left, are Linda Moore (Camp's grandmother), Deborah Lockyer (his mother), Bart Lockyer (his father), and Nicholle Lockyer (his sister).

IDAHO FALLS — Geoffrey Salem Elawadly, age 24, was sentenced Thursday for the second degree murder of Anthony (A.J.) Camp on March 22, 2011.
Seventh District Judge Jon J. Shindurling sentenced Elawadly to a minimum of 10 years to life in the Idaho Department of Correction.
Elawadly had confessed to second degree murder. In the plea agreement, the deadly weapon enhancement and the two counts of aggravated assault were dismissed.
Elawadly's seven year indeterminate sentence for possession of a controlled substance will be served concurrently with the second degree murder sentence.
"This was a senseless crime—a tragic crime with no possibility of recovery," said Judge Shindurling. "A life is lost.
"This changes everything for the family of the victim and you," the judge said. "You were upset over a drug deal and then there was a chase and shooting."
(Elawadly aimed at the fleeing car and shot two shots, killing Camp.)
"You have a long criminal history since back to when you were 12-years-old," Shindurling said. "This is your fourth felony conviction.
"I hope at some point you assess what you're doing and hope you change," he said.
"This crime requires a significant penalty," Shindurling said.
Elawadly must also pay $150.50 for court costs; $75 for the victim's relief fund and up to $100 for his pre-sentence report.
Bonneville County Prosecuting Attorney Bruce Pickett said, "This is a senseless crime that occurred.
"People say that drugs do not affect people but drugs have taking someone's life," Pickett said.
"I think the judge made a well thought out decision," he said. "The way the sentence is structured, Elawadly can prove to the parole board that he has changed. Until then, he will be incarcerated."
"It's what we wanted," said Deborah Lockyer, the mother of the victim, A.J. Camp. "I've waited a long time for this—a year and one-half."
Camp's father, Bart Lockyer, said, "It feels good, getting justice for my son although this will never bring my son back."
Camp's sister, Nicholle Lockyer, said, "I wish he got life."

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