The Daily Press http://www.am-news.com http://www.am-news.com/apfeed.xml--1 Blackfoot Morning News | AP iAtom feed Copyright The Daily Press 2014-09-16T23:59:07-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9513Blackfoot district official explains shortfall2014-09-16T23:59:07-04:002014-09-16T23:59:07-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsThere was standing room only at Tuesday's school board meeting as Kress went through a PowerPoint presentation explaining in detail "three major reasons" why the district has found itself in such a deep hole and how the budget will be revised to help make up the deficit.Kress said the three reasons are: 1) An overage in operating expenditures. 2) Underperforming revenues 3) Budgeting/accounting errors.In explaining reason No.1, Kress said that several small overages in the cost of utilities, supplies, substitutes, salaries and transportation equated to a $250,000 budget revision.Kress elaborated further on reason No.2 (underperforming revenues) specifically Medicaid and Impact Aid. Kress said the district budgeted for $300,000 in these federal revenues, but that only $150,000 has come in.For more on this story, turn to our print and e-editions.Blackfoot, IDLISA LETEBlackfoot district official explains shortfallBlackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9513Change0Usable2014-09-16T23:59:07-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9508Feds reject Blackfoot grant request2014-09-15T23:58:28-04:002014-09-15T23:58:28-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsCity leaders have been toying with the idea of constructing an overpass or underpass for years and Blackfoot Mayor Paul Loomis had made it one of his goals to start the process.The city applied for the Tiger Grant through the U.S. Department of Transportation this spring in hope of receiving $800,000 with city matching funds of $200,000.Blackfoot, IDLISA LETEFeds reject Blackfoot grant requestBlackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9508Change0Usable2014-09-15T23:58:28-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9506Blackfoot school district to address $1 million shortfall 2014-09-15T01:08:06-04:002014-09-15T01:08:06-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsOn Friday, Board chairman Dewane Wren acknowledged the massive deficit, saying, "There are three or four reasons why this happened. We'll be able to get past this and make it up but the budget will have to be revised."Wren said that there will likely be a "hiring freeze" but that no school programs should have to be cut. More ideas will be discussed in detail at the budget hearing.Wren encourages the district's patrons to attend Tuesday's meeting, saying, "We want to stop the rumors and be upfront and transparent about it [the shortfall]."Blackfoot, IDLiSA LETEBlackfoot school district to address $1 million shortfall Blackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9506Change0Usable2014-09-15T01:08:06-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9503Public hearing will reopen 2014 county budget 2014-09-13T01:29:01-04:002014-09-13T01:29:01-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsTwo public hearings will take place at that time. At the first public hearing, commissioners will reopen the 2014 budget to receive some grant money. The second public hearing will add $7,268 to the ambulance budget. There are three ambulance districts in Bingham County—Blackfoot, Shelley/Firth and Aberdeen. Each ambulance district receives a percentage of this amount based on the area the ambulance district covers. The $7,268 is reimbursement that was requested by the ambulance districts. Pacific Corp. of Idaho filed three separate complaints. The complaints were filed 2008, 2009 and 2010-2013. The court ruled three times—in each complaint—that the values the state tax commission had assessed on the utility were too high, that the tax commission had taxed the Pacific Corp. of Idaho too much. The various tax districts, where the Pacific Corp. had property, were assessed tax levies to help pay the overcharge. Blackfoot, IDLESLIE MIELKEPublic hearing will reopen 2014 county budget Blackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9503Change0Usable2014-09-13T01:29:01-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9501Cops photograph alleged sleeping Florida burglar2014-09-12T11:25:28-04:002014-09-12T11:25:28-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsPolice say an accused burglar continued snoozing next to a bag of jewelry he was allegedly planning to swipe even after deputies began snapping pictures of him.According to the Sarasota County Sheriff's Office Facebook page, a cleaning lady discovered 29-year-old Dion Davis on a bed inside the victim's home Monday.Deputies say they took several photographs of the sleeping Davis, but he didn't wake up.Blackfoot, IDMORNING NEWSCops photograph alleged sleeping Florida burglarBlackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9501Change0Usable2014-09-12T11:25:28-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9498VIDEO: Obamas, Americans Remember Victims of 9/11 Attacks2014-09-11T15:29:29-04:002014-09-11T15:29:29-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning News<script type="text/javascript"async src="http://launch.newsinc.com/js/embed.js" id="_nw2e-js"></script>Blackfoot, IDMORNING NEWSVIDEO: Obamas, Americans Remember Victims of 9/11 AttacksBlackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9498Change0Usable2014-09-11T15:29:29-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9495Author speaks on getting published2014-09-10T23:44:34-04:002014-09-10T23:44:34-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsGatewood, a longtime Blackfoot resident, has three published novels of suspense and romance ("Winter Secret," "Spring Promise" and "Summer Truth") under her belt since 2012. She is gearing up to write the fourth and final novel of the series titled "Autumn Hush."Gatewood, 66, who raised 7 children and now a grandmother of 19, said she just loves to write and encourages others who dream of publishing a book to come to the workshop."It's important to learn new things, regardless of your age. That's what life is all about" she said. "Writing helps keep me on my toes and I'm not going to stop."To read a synopsis on Gatewood's books, go to: www.lindagatewoodbooks.com. Her books can also be downloaded at www.Tatepublishing.com/bookstore and can be checked out at the Blackfoot Public Library.Blackfoot, IDLISA LETEAuthor speaks on getting publishedBlackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9495Change0Usable2014-09-10T23:44:34-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9494Illinois volunteers grill 100-foot-long bratwurst2014-09-10T19:30:00-04:002014-09-10T19:30:00-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsSilver Creek Saloon hosted the practice run Tuesday to prepare for the city's 200th anniversary celebration, where the volunteers will attempt to grill a 200-foot-long bratwurst, the Belleville News-Democrat reported. The Bicentennial Oktoberfest Weekend Celebration is set to be held Sept. 19-21 in downtown Belleville.On Tuesday, Larry Schubert, who made the 60-pound sausage, led the effort to unroll it onto a specially made 100-foot metal trough. Volunteers exercised more caution after practicing in August with a 50-foot bratwurst that broke in several places because it was turned too quickly and the grill was too hot. Organizers walked around to inspect and fix splits in the meat.Blackfoot, IDMORNING NEWSIllinois volunteers grill 100-foot-long bratwurstBlackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9494Change0Usable2014-09-10T19:30:00-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9491Canada finds 1 of 2 explorer ships lost in Arctic 
2014-09-09T23:26:23-04:002014-09-09T23:15:33-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsLast seen in the 1840s while under the command of Rear Adm. Sir John Franklin, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror have long been among the most sought-after prizes in marine archaeology and the subject of songs, poems and novels.Prime Minister Stephen Harper's office said the well-preserved wreck of one of the vessels was found Sunday with the help of a remotely operated underwater vehicle. It was 11 meters (yards) below the surface, near King William Island, about 1,200 miles northwest of Toronto.Harper said that it is unclear which ship it is, but that sonar images yielded enough information to confirm it was one of Franklin's."This is truly a historic moment for Canada," said Harper, who was beaming, uncharacteristically. "This has been a great Canadian story and mystery and the subject of scientists, historians, writers and singers, so I think we really have an important day in mapping the history of our country."Harper said the discovery would shed light on what happened to Franklin's crew.Franklin and 128 hand-picked officers and men disappeared after setting out in 1845 for the Northwest Passage, the long-sought shortcut to Asia that supposedly ran from the Atlantic to the Pacific by way of the harsh, ice-choked Arctic.Historians believe the ships were lost in 1848 after they became locked in the ice near King William Island and the crews abandoned them in a hopeless bid to reach safety. Inuit lore tells of "white men who were starving" as late as the winter of 1850 on the Royal Geographical Society Island.For many years afterward, Franklin was celebrated as a Victorian-era hero.Dozens of searches by the British and Americans in the 1800s failed to locate the wrecks, and some of those expeditions ended in tragedy, too. But they opened up parts of the Canadian Arctic to discovery and ultimately spied a Northwest Passage, though it proved inhospitable to shipping because of ice and treacherous weather.Canada announced in 2008 that it would look for the ships, and Harper's government has poured millions into the venture, with the prime minister himself taking part in the search.Harper's government made the project a top priority as it looked to assert Canada's sovereignty over the Northwest Passage, where melting Arctic ice in recent years has unlocked the very shipping route Franklin was after.Canada says it owns the passage. The U.S. and others say it is international territory.Ryan Harris, an underwater archaeologist helping to lead the Parks Canada search, said a sonar image shows some of the ship's deck structures, including the main mast, which was sheared off by the ice when the vessel sank. He said the contents of the ship are most likely in the same good condition.The next step is to send divers to explore the ship and any artifacts. The exact location of the wreck was not disclosed for fear of looters.The discovery came shortly after a coast guard helicopter pilot spotted a dark, U-shaped object in the Arctic snow. The orange-brown piece of metal bore the markings of the Royal Navy. It was a davit — part of a lifting mechanism, likely for a lifeboat, for one of the two lost Franklin ships, the search team said."That's the clue that tells you: Look here. That's the flag," said John Geiger, president of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Geiger was with the search team.Andrew Campbell, a vice president at Parks Canada, said a combination of previous Inuit testimony, past modeling of ice patterns by the Canadian Ice Service, and the measurements of the two lost vessels — they are so similar they can't yet be told apart — convinced the searchers that this was a Franklin ship.When the search team telephoned Campbell in Ottawa with the news early Sunday, "they cried, I cried. It was quite a moment," he said.Other tantalizing traces have been found over the years, including the bodies of three crewmen discovered in the 1980s. Among them was a petty officer whose perfectly preserved remains were in an ice-filled coffin.The search for an Arctic passage to Asia frustrated explorers for centuries, beginning with John Cabot's voyage in 1497. The shortcut eluded other famous explorers, including Henry Hudson and Francis Drake.Blackfoot, IDMORNING NEWSCanada finds 1 of 2 explorer ships lost in Arctic 
Blackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9491Change0Usable2014-09-09T23:15:33-04:00 urn:publicid:dailypress.com:9490House condemns Obama for prisoner swap 
2014-09-09T19:04:58-04:002014-09-09T19:04:58-04:00Copyright 2010 Blackfoot Morning NewsThe vote was 249-163, with 22 Democrats — many locked in tough re-election races — breaking ranks and backing the nonbinding resolution."By setting free five top Taliban commanders from U.S. custody, the Obama administration made Americans less safe," Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said in a statement.The vote castigating Obama came at a crucial moment for the administration as it sought to rally international and congressional support for steps to combat the rising threat of Islamic state militants in Iraq and Syria. The debate and vote coincided with a White House meeting in which the president discussed his strategy with House and Senate leaders. It also came on the eve of Obama's address to the nation."What poor timing for a resolution," said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas.Rep. Alcee Hastings, D-Fla., suggested that the House vote on the measure less than two months before the election was simply an effort to appease core Republican voters.Republicans insisted that Obama clearly violated a law requiring the administration to notify Congress at least 30 days before transferring prisoners from the Guantanamo Bay prison. A Government Accountability Office report last month also reached that conclusion."The administration deprived Congress of the opportunity to consider the national security risk or the repercussions of negotiating with terrorists," said Rep. Howard "Buck" McKeon, R-Calif., chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.Five senior Taliban were released from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo in exchange for the Army sergeant who had disappeared from his post in Paktika province in eastern Afghanistan on June 30, 2009. The five Taliban are to remain in Qatar for a year.Republican lawmakers and some Democrats were angry with Obama and members of the administration for failing to notify them about the swap even as 80 to 90 members of the government knew of the exchange. The administration has offered a number of explanations for keeping Congress in the dark, including concern about Bergdahl's health and safety required speedy action and concern that lawmakers would divulge details of the deal and scuttle it.Rep. Adam Smith of Washington state, the top Democrat on Armed Services, said the president should have notified Congress, but Obama has said his constitutional authority as commander in chief superseded the law to apprise lawmakers.The resolution was a partisan attack by a Republican House on a Democratic president, said Smith, who argued that Republican President George W. Bush repeatedly violated the law with post-Sept. 11 warrantless wiretaps and indefinite detentions.Democratic Rep. John Barrow of Georgia, who faces a tough re-election this fall, backed the resolution, complaining that Obama negotiated with terrorists and treated Congress as an afterthought.Some in Congress have said Bergdahl was a deserter and the United States gave up too much for his freedom. Several lawmakers have cited intelligence suggesting the high-level Taliban officials could return to the Afghanistan battlefield.The resolution, which lacks the force of law and won't be considered in the Senate, "condemns and disapproves of the failure of the Obama administration to comply with the lawful 30-day statutory reporting requirement in executing the transfer of five senior members of the Taliban from detention at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba."The measure says these actions "have burdened unnecessarily the trust and confidence in the commitment and ability of the Obama administration to constructively engage and work with Congress."The resolution does express relief that Bergdahl has returned safely to the United States.The Joint Chiefs of Staff has unanimously supported the exchange, insisting that the United States has a sacred commitment to men and women who serve that it will never leave anyone behind on the battlefield. Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, said the swap in May was "likely our last, best opportunity" to free Bergdahl.Blackfoot, IDMORNING NEWSHouse condemns Obama for prisoner swap 
Blackfoot Morning Newsurn:publicid:dailypress.com:9490Change0Usable2014-09-09T19:04:58-04:00